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Why Staff Leave Based on Employee Education Levels

Why Staff Leave

New employee research conducted by great{with}talent.

New research about why staff leave shows significant trends in staff retention for 2014. Find out the employee motivation behind voluntary leavers.

Why Staff Leave Based on Employee Education Levels

great{with}talent has collected exit data from 12,837 employees. The results show why employees leave in 2014.

It also shows the importance of conducting exit interviews as the results can improve staff retention strategies. This has currently become even more important due to the skills shortage.

This exit data has been drilled down to employee education levels. These include: degree and above, A-levels and other. The results show the different demographic needs of staff.

The exit survey results show that higher skilled employees are at the highest risk of voluntarily leaving organisations. Talent management and staff retention has become more important amongst this group despite tough financial times. Meanwhile all levels have different needs. (Click the images for more.)

Find out How to Calculate Staff Turnover Rate with Exit Process Cost Calculator.

All Other Employees

Beginning with employees who have ‘other’ education levels, this batch includes 2,898 of employees who have left organisations in the past 12 months. This group also has the largest percentage of involuntary leavers.

Within the top five reasons for leaving, involuntary leavers aren’t included. The number one reason why staff leave is due to a more competitive salary available elsewhere (33%).

The second highest reason is low morale (31%) which is the highest ranking for why employees leave. This may reflect both on the nature of low skilled work.

Staff engagement strategies for this group can be more of a struggle for this reason. Additionally, one size does not fit all and meeting their particular needs can help improve the results of employee engagement measures.

The lack of relationship between job performance and reward (29%) was also a concern. Alongside lack of promotion opportunities (29%) and inadequate level of pay (28%).

These are common reasons why staff leave. Yet, rewards were a higher concern amongst this group. Therefore, employee engagement solutions need to reflect this in order to increase staff retention.

Read: Recruitment Strategies and Employee Retention are a Mixed Bag for the NSPCC.

A-level Employees

Next up is employees who have ‘A-level’ education levels, this batch includes 1,866 of employees who have left organisations in the past 12 months. This group has the highest level of ‘happy’ leavers.

Similarly the top five reasons for leaving only includes voluntary leavers. The number one reason why employees leave is again a more competitive salary available elsewhere (34%). As a result, aiming to provide a competitive salary is of high importance.

A close second is a lack of promotion opportunities (33%) which has increased in importance. Whilst an inadequate level of pay (31%) has also risen as a concern.

On the other hand, a lack of relationship between job performance and reward (30%) and low morale (27%) have lowered. This needs to be reflected in employee engagement strategies.

Read: The Importance of the Recruitment and Retention of Staff.

Degree and Above Employees

Next up is employees who have ‘degree and above’ education levels, this batch includes 7,771 of employees who have left organisations in the past 12 months. This group has the highest level of ‘unhappy’ leavers. This raises red flags as this group are the most skilled workers.

Again the top five results for why employees leave only includes voluntary leavers. The top reason in this band is a lack of promotion opportunities (40%).

This is even more expressed by the second highest issue: being unclear as to how to progress within the organisation (35%).

It’s clear that the higher the education level the more importance is placed on career progression. Opportunities need to be made clear to this staff group. Lack there of is also key with potential employees.

A more competitive salary elsewhere (33%) remains at the same level. Whilst a lack of relationship between job performance and reward (32%) has risen slightly.

A new factor in the top five is also when promotion is too slow (30%). All of which proves that higher levels of education raises staff expectations.

By tailoring employee engagement strategies to different groups this can improve their effectiveness. This includes higher productivity, improved customer service and lower staff turnover.

Contact great{with}talent and find out more about their LastOpinion exit interviews.

(Main image from AZ Central)

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